New dating and analysis published concerning human footprints found near Ol Doinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania

An interdisciplinary research team has published a recent paper in the journal Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology  concerning the dating of more than 400 Homo sapiens footprints at the Engare Sero site in northern Tanzania. The authors contend that the Engare Sero site provides the largest and best-preserved footprints of anatomically modern humans in Africa.  Interpreting results from stable isotope analysis and other techniques, the researchers contend that the footprints were made by humans on a mudflat saturated by a freshwater spring and later inundated by water from Lake Natron.  Results from Argon-argon dating and radiocarbon dating methods suggest that the footprints were made between about 5,700 years and 19,000 years ago.

See National Geographic story from October 10, 2016

See 2016 scholarly publication in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology

 

 Mudflats in the shadow of the Ol Doinyo Lengai volcano captured a huge trove of ancient human footprints.  PHOTOGRAPH BY ROBERT CLARK, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE

Mudflats in the shadow of the Ol Doinyo Lengai volcano captured a huge trove of ancient human footprints.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ROBERT CLARK, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE